Seattle indie game developer tinyBuild raises $15M, plans to grow using ‘dynamic structure’ strategy

Seattle indie game developer tinyBuild raises $15M, plans to grow using ‘dynamic structure’ strategy

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tinyBuild, the Seattle-area indie game developer and publisher of titles such as Hello Neighbor and Rapture Rejects, has raised a $15 million investment to fuel growth.

Founded eight years ago, tinyBuild partners with third-party studios to turn small game prototypes into full products. It started with games such as No Time to Explain, Party Hard, and Clustertruck. Its most recent title, Hello Neighbor, was tinyBuild’s first franchise that spawned multiplayer spin-offs, prequels, and a book series that just crossed 1 million in sales.

The 27-person company will use the fresh cash to hire in Seattle and Amsterdam. Alex Nichiporchik, co-founder and CEO, told GeekWire that tinyBuild plans to grow with what he described as a “dynamic structure.”

“We don’t necessarily hire for specific roles, rather build roles around people’s skills — and when the industry changes, morph those roles into whatever is relevant at the time,” he said in an email. “I strongly believe it’s dangerous to build companies in the games industry that rely on a strict structure with specific roles — the industry is dynamic, and so is tinyBuild. The flip side of this is that it can often feel like everything is on fire. Organized chaos is what I call it!”

Nichiporchik declined to provide details about investors in the round. The company previously raised money from Makers Fund.

According to the Washington Interactive Network, the greater Seattle area is home to roughly 400 video game developers, representing around 23,000 jobs and over $28 billion in annual revenue.

Related: Q&A: tinyBuild CEO Alex Nichiporchik on the ideas that ‘curl up on you and manifest into game design’

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